GI Jane Finances

January 4, 2010

Lost decade?

Filed under: Uncategorized — gijanefinances @ 6:36 am
Good article in the NYT about savings.  I think I started 2000 with about $4 to 5k and ended 2009 with $90,950 in retirement savings.  I do not have a match.  The real powerhouse is my Roth IRA.  I put in less money due to the contribution limits and have about the same amount as in the TSP.  I put in practically double for TSP, apart from this year, and earned $11,000 in the Roth.  I have the amount of money of what I basically contributed in the TSP.  The only good thing about the TSP is that I pay less in taxes and receive a nice refund back.  I would not be able to have a refund if I did not contribute into the TSP.  I also repaid $42,000 in student loans and paid off $50,000 in car loans and credit cards.  So, this next decade is all about saving money for a house payment, nice car and travel.  I also want to semi-retire at 45 years old with a military pension.  This will be the year to know at what rank, inshallah.
 
 
For savers it was hardly a lost decade
By Ron Leiber 

It was the age of zeroes, the epoch of naughts, an era when we started with something and added just about nothing.

At least that’s what stock market commentators have been gravely telling us for at least a year. The 2000s, they argue, was a lost decade. And at first glance, they appear to have gotten it exactly right.

If you invested $100,000 on Jan. 1, 2000, in the Vanguard index fund that tracks the Standard & Poor’s 500, you would have ended up with $89,072 by mid-December of 2009. Adjust that for inflation by putting it in January 2000 dollars and you’re left with $69,114.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/02/your-money/stocks-and-bonds/02money.html?ref=your-money&pagewanted=print

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2 Comments »

  1. *sigh*

    But better to have saved SOMETHING than NOTHING, right?

    Comment by FB @ FabulouslyBroke.com — January 5, 2010 @ 4:48 am

  2. Yep! Look forward to the next decade having a paid off rental.

    Comment by gijanefinances — January 5, 2010 @ 6:23 am


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